Various Collins and Hollister death notices.





Waukesha Freeman
May 31, 1877
Page 3

Mukwonago
... The funeral of My. Fred. Collins, who died on his way home from Denver City, was held in the Congregational church on Friday, May 20. It will be remembered that Mr. Collins started from this place in company with his brother to Denver City a few weeks ago, with hopes of improving his health which, had been failing him for some months, and found no help and seemed to become worse all the time, till his brother resolved to return home with him. He died near Kansas City. He leaves a large circle of friends and relatives to mourn his loss.

Waukesha Freeman
June 21, 1877
Page 2

In Memory.

Mukwonago Division, No. 127, Sons of Temperance, at a recent meeting adopted the following preamble and resolutions:

Whereas, It has pleased God in his providence to remove by death our highly esteemed associate and brother, Fred Collins, from our midst, we believe it but fitting and proper as past members and associates of the deceased - while we bow submissively to the decrees of Him whose ways are not our ways and are past finding out, yet who doeth all things well - should commemorate the event in such a manner as will tend to remind us of the necessity of our being also ready; therefore

Resolved, That in the death of brother Fred Collins the Division has lost a highly esteemed and beloved member, and the cause of temperance an efficient and faithful laborer; and we shall long cherish in memory his many virtues and his untiring zeal in behalf of fallen humanity.

Resolved, That we hereby tender to the afflicted family of the deceased brother our heartfelt sympathy in this their hour of affliction, and would invoke for them the blessings of Him who Atempers the wind to the shorn lamb, praying that He may in His mercy no grant them that consolation which they so much stand in need.

Resolved, That these resolutions be published in the county papers, and a copy thereof be presented to the family of the deceased.

F.S. Andrews
Parthena Chafin
Ida Kober

Waukesha Freeman
November 26, 1885
Page 1, Col. 6

W.P. Collins.

Last Friday night occurred the death at Mukwonago of Dr. W. P. Collins, in the 67th year of his age. The deceased was a native of New England, and settled with his family in Waukesha county about thirty years ago. Nearly all of this period was spent in Mukwonago, where he was engaged in the practice of his profession, though his health has prevented active labors in this direction a considerable portion of the time. His disease was consumption, superinduced by blood-poisoning, to which he became a victim years ago while attending to professional duties. From this cause he was a great sufferer, yet he sustained himself under most trying and discouraging conditions, and continued his medical work with a fair degree of success.

The funeral took place on Sunday last at the U. and U. Church, in the village of Mukwonago, and was largely attended by friends and neighbors of the family.

Dr. Collins leaves a wife and four children to mourn his death. In their sorrow they have the sincerest sympathy of all.

Waukesha Freeman
July 18, 1912
Page 8

Deaths
Hollis Hollister

Hollis Hollister died at his home in the village of Mukwonago July 8. He was a son of Asa and Almira Hollister and was born in Barford, Can., July 4, 1832, therefore was 80 years old this last Fourth. The family came to Vernon in 1839, Asa Hollister being the first blacksmith in the town.

Hollis Hollister married Esther M. Clark August 20, 1854, by whom he had four children, all of whom are living - Alfred on the old farm, O. L. In Milwaukee, Mary (Mrs. H. D. Hollenback) of Rockford, Ill., and Rose (Mrs. Curtius), who has been his housekeeper since his wife's death in 1900. Mr. Hollister also leaves his older sister, Mrs. Mariette Whitman of Nashua, Fla., who is spending the summer at B. W. Craig's, and his youngest sister, Mrs. James Hutton, of Marshfield, and many nieces and nephews, children of his six sisters.

Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock at the Hollister home in Mukwonago. Rev. Mr. Moody of Big Bend preached the sermon. Burial was in the family lot at Dodges Corners cemetery. For the most part of his four score years, Mr. Hollister was noted for his vigorous health, mental strength a

nd ardent advocacy of education, and he gave to his own children every advantage and help he could toward a liberal education. In many respects, he was a typical Wisconsin pioneer. A good neighbor, strong in mind and in body, capable to do and able to endure. He has helped to make of the primitive wilderness the well established, influential commonwealth of Wisconsin - a state wondrous in natural resources and beauty - she has become, under the hand of the husbandman, a veritable paradise of material and intellectual bounty and good, and when the roll of those contributing toward the transformation shall have been engrossed, among the great and good doubtless will be the names of woodsmen and grangers, of soldiers and statesmen, of school masters and of matrons. A debt we owe, an obligation we sustain, toward each and all of these. For every trial and sacrifice endured, for every obstacle surmounted, we owe them gratitude, lasting gratitude. Let us bury their faults, as we entomb their bodies, but ever laud and emulate their virtues. The Wisconsin of today is greater and grander because they have lived and loved and served.

Ira E. Moody.

Obituary for Mary Cassey Collins



WAUKESHA, WISCONSIN, MARCH 12, 1903
VOLUME XLV, NO. II
DEATHS OF ONE WEEK.
Mrs. Mary Collins of Mukwonago Passes Away
HAD LIVED THERE FIFTY YEARS
Mrs. Mary Collins

Died, March 2nd, at her home of forty-four years, Mrs. Mary (Cassey) Collins, after many weeks, months, years of suffering.

Mary Cassey was born in Aberdeen, Scotland, October 10, 1826. Her widowed mother came to America in 1834, and with her two daughters made her home with her brother, a man of great intellectual powers and attainments, graduate of Edinborough University. Like many other men of great intellect, he was so absorbed in attaining knowledge, that the material things of life claimed little of his attention and very early in life the young girl was thrown upon her own efforts for her livelihood, but the fine culture of the uncle and the love of learning back of his culture, enabled her to start life's battle with inherited intelligence and a strong love for learning. So, although her opportunities for schooling were very limited, her learning was far in advance of average, her command of the English language was to be greatly envied and desired; she was, in its best sense, an educated woman.

At the age of 23, she married Dr. W. P. Collins of Providence, R. I.. in 1856 the young couple with three babies came to Wisconsin and lived at Prospect for two years, then on solicitation of Dr. Nash; they came to Mukwonago and built up the home she grew to love so well. Here their three younger children were born. Here Wilfred, the third child, who died at the age of 23, on his way home from Colorado was brought. Already years of suffering from blood poisoning had enfeebled Dr. Collins and made life very hard for his wife, but spite of accumulated sorrows and heavy cares and the exercise of the closest economy, she was a very happy woman; and made life very happy for those about her. In 1885, Dr. Collins died; at the age of 65 after 20 years of such suffering as few must endure, but which had been lightened and brightened by the cheery, happy wife beside him.

In 1889, Edgar, the fourth child, died at the age of 29.

Few people know so much suffering and privation as she knew in her life and few people are so cheery and happy in the face many privations. She was broad in her views of life and they helped her to overlook many of the nagging small worries of life. She was above them. She was wonderfully just in her estimate of character and motives and very charitable in her judgments. A few days before her death she said: "if people were only as tender and pitiful to moral weakness as they are to physical weakness, how good it would be."

An ever increasing love of knowledge, high ideals of living, an impregnable fidelity to truth and purity - these attributes of character could not help but elevate those with whom she came in contact. She was always a reformer and in the advance of reforms. She did her living well and thoroughly.

There were left to sadly mourn her loss, her two oldest children, Alura and Lindley, and her two youngest children, W. P. and May. Her grandchildren were very dear to her, especially the two who made their home with her since their babyhood, and also the baby daughter of W. P.

Collins. She loved babies, children, youth and beauty.

Death resulted from heart disease of long standing and induced by advancing age.

The funeral services took place Wednesday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock from the Congregational Church, Rev. Nellie Mann Opdale, of La Crosse, Wis., a dear friend of the family, paid the last tribute to the departed, after which the interment took place in the Mukwonago cemetery beside her life's companion and sons.

Waukesha Freeman
July 18, 1912
Page 8

Deaths

Hollis Hollister

Hollis Hollister died at his home in the village of Mukwonago July 8. He was a son of Asa and Almira Hollister and was born in Barford, Can., July 4, 1832, therefore was 80 years old this last Fourth. The family came to Vernon in 1839, Asa Hollister being the first blacksmith in the town.

Hollis Hollister married Esther M. Clark August 20, 1854, by whom he had four children, all of whom are living - Alfred on the old farm, O. L. In Milwaukee, Mary (Mrs. H. D. Hollenback) of Rockford, Ill., and Rose (Mrs. Curtius), who has been his housekeeper since his wife's death in 1900. Mr. Hollister also leaves his older sister, Mrs. Mariette Whitman of Nashua, Fla., who is spending the summer at B. W. Craig's, and his youngest sister, Mrs. James Hutton, of Marshfield, and many nieces and nephews, children of his six sisters.

Funeral services were held Thursday afternoon at 2 o'clock at the Hollister home in Mukwonago. Rev. Mr. Moody of Big Bend preached the sermon. Burial was in the family lot at Dodges Corners cemetery.

For the most part of his four score years, Mr. Hollister was noted for his vigorous health, mental strength and ardent advocacy of education, and he gave to his own children every advantage and help he could toward a liberal education. In many respects, he was a typical Wisconsin pioneer. A good neighbor, strong in mind and in body, capable to do and able to endure. He has helped to make of the primitive wilderness the well established, influential commonwealth of Wisconsin - a state wondrous in natural resources and beauty - she has become, under the hand of the husbandman, a veritable paradise of material and intellectual bounty and good, and when the roll of those contributing toward the transformation shall have been engrossed, among the great and good doubtless will be the names of woodsmen and grangers, of soldiers and statesmen, of school masters and of matrons. A debt we owe, an obligation we sustain, toward each and all of these. For every trial and sacrifice endured, for every obstacle surmounted, we owe them gratitude, lasting gratitude. Let us bury their faults, as we entomb their bodies, but ever laud and emulate their virtues. The Wisconsin of today is greater and grander because they have lived and loved and served.

Ira E. Moody.

Waukesha Freeman
December 11, 1935
Page 4

From Freeman Files.

Fifty Years Ago.
During the past week S. H. Barstow, Solomon T. Bolles and Dr. William P. Collins died.@

Waukesha Freeman
November 18, 1936
Page 2, Col. 7
Brookfield News
Mrs. Alfred Hollister formerly Miss Alura Collins, who only a few weeks ago celebrated her golden wedding, died early Sunday morning at her home here just south of the village. Mr. and Mrs. George Clark of Big Bend called at the Hollister and Edgerton homes Sunday afternoon.

Waukesha Freeman
November 18, 1936
Page 3, Col. 5

Pioneer Mukwonago Woman is Dead.
Mrs. Alfred Hollister, nee Alura Collins, a pioneer resident of Mukwonago, died Sunday morning at her home. A month ago Mr. and Mrs. Hollister celebrated their golden wedding anniversary. Funeral services were held Wednesday at 1 p.m. from Powers' funeral home, Mukwonago. Mrs. Hollister is survived by her husband and three children.

Waukesha Freeman
November 18, 1936
Page 10, Col. 1
Big Bend News
Friends here learn with sorrow of the death of Mrs. A. N. Hollister, Mukwonago, Sunday morning, Nov. 15. Mr. and Mrs. Hollister resided in Big Bend many years ago and have life-long friends in the village. Mr. and Mrs. G. E. Clark called at the A. N. Hollister home, Mukwonago, Sunday afternoon.

Waukesha Freeman
May 25, 1938
Page 9, Col. 3

Former County Resident Dead.
Alfred N. Hollister, 83, an old resident of Mukwonago, died at a hospital in Chicago Sunday after an illness of ten days. His wife, Alura, died in November, 1936.

Surviving are two daughters, Esther and Mary of Chicago; a son, William of Troy Center, and several grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

Funeral services were held Wednesday afternoon at the Charles Powers funeral home at Mukwonago, and burial was in the Big Bend cemetery. The Rev. Arthur Brown officiated at the services.

Waukesha Freeman
May 25, 1938
Page 10, Col. 2
Big Bend News
Friends here have learned of the death of Alfred Hollister, age 86, at a Chicago hospital Sunday evening. The funeral was held in Mukwonago Wednesday. The Hollister family resided in Big Bend for a time many years ago when Mr. Hollister, in company with H. E. Nicolai, operated a general store in the village. He was an old time resident of Dodges Corners but for many years had made his home in Mukwonago. His wife, Alura Collins Hollister, preceeded him in death several years ago. Services were held at the Powers funeral home.

Burial took place at the Rural Home cemetery, Big Bend.

Waukesha Freeman
May 25, 1938
Page 9, Col. 6
Mukwonago News
Word reached here last Sunday of the death of Alfred N. Hollister, who had recently undergone a serious bladder trouble operation. Mr. Hollister was visiting his daughters in Chicago when he was taken ill about a week ago. The body was brought here to the Powers funeral home. The services were held on Wednesday afternoon, Rev. A. Brown of the Congregational church officiating, with burial at Big Bend. Mr. Hollister was for years a resident of this village and was 82 years old. He leaves to mourn one son, William Hollister, of Troy Center; two daughters, Mary (Mrs. John Stacy) and Esther, both residing in Chicago. He has one brother, Orrie Hollister, living in Milwaukee. His wife, Alura Collins Hollister, passed away a year ago last November.

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